Audit finds prison doctors paid for hours not worked

From: Las Vegas Sun
Dec 12th 2012, By Cy Ryan

CARSON CITY — Doctors hired by Nevada’s prison system may have been paid $1.9 million for hours they didn’t work, an audit found.

The audit found that full-time physicians, who are employed to work four ten-hour shifts a week, put in an average of only 5.3 hours per day. Part-time doctors work two ten-hour days.

“We estimate the annualized unsupported payments for full time doctors and part time doctors for fiscal year 2012 were approximately $1.9 million,” said the report by the Division of Internal Audits in the state Department of Administration.

The 23 physicians at the seven state prisons are paid an hourly rate ranging from $64 to $82.
An audit several years ago found that physicians hired in the state mental health system failed to put in the hours they were paid for, prompting officials to tighten controls.

The prison audit included physicians, dentists and psychiatrists.

The audit says physicians, as exempt employees, are not required to work the full ten-hour daily shift, but standard practice in Nevada is they put in “something equivalent to a 40 hour work week or more.”

Read the rest here: http://www.lasvegassun.com/news/2012/dec/12/audit-finds-prison-doctors-paid-hours-not-worked/

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Audit Seeks Answers about Prison Sentences in Nevada

From: MyNews4, Reported by Joe Hart, on July 16th to 18th, 2012:

Prison officials first told News Four in March there was no need to track possible computer mistakes that may be keeping inmates locked up longer than they should be.

“Some people would probably say yes but what’s the point of tracking them as long as you fix them ?”  Steve Suwe told us at the time. Suwe is the public information officer for the Nevada Department of Corrections.
But state lawmakers have a different view.  Now, the Department of Corrections is facing its first ever audit to find out whether a computer glitch may be adding false charges to inmates records.

State Assemblyman William Horne, who chairs the Advisory Commission on the Administration of Justice called for the audit after questioning prison officials about the issue.

“We need to find out whether this is actually happening and if so, we need to correct it,” Horne told News 4.
The issue dates back to 2007  when the Department of Corrections switched over to a new computer system.  Prison officials told us the new system got tripped up when calculating certain types of sentences, 
especially those with indefinite terms such as ten years to life.

 News four obtained a copy of a deposition from a lawsuit filed on behalf of former inmate Nolan Klein.
Former warden and deputy director at NDOC Don Helling testified in his deposition last year that quote  “All of the old data was flipped over into the new information system and when the information was flipped, errors occurred.”

But prison officials say even if errors did happen they were caught and corrected.  They insist no inmate has ever served extra time because of a computer mistake.

“We haven’t found one case where the computer has added a sentence,” said Rex Reed, who oversees inmate management for the Nevada Department of Corrections.

But state lawmakers say they’re aren’t satisfied with the answers they have received from the Department of Corrections. In fact in his letter to the Legislative Counsel Bureau dated June 14th, Assemblyman Horne wrote:  “I have not received any satisfactory answers.”

 Horne’s letter asks the audit division to find out:

-whether any errors showed up on inmates records as a result of the computer switchover in 2007.
-whether any errors turned up on records reported to the parole board.
-how the department of corrections resolves complaints about inmate records.
-and whether changes are needed to improve the d-o-c’s computerized offender tracking system.

Horne says the audit could be just the first step.

Read the rest here: http://www.mynews4.com/content/news/factfinder/story/Audit-Seeks-Answers-about-Prison-Sentences-in/lST19yH4jEOBahgdNcAkjg.cspx

Audit of Nevada Prison Sentences underway

From: CarsonNow on 16th July 2012

Tonja Brown of Carson City says a computer glitch is the reason her brother Nolan Klein died in prison.
But Brown — who recently won a $50,000 settlement from the state after claiming her brother received inadequate medical care in prison — says Nolan should have been released. She says a computer glitch kept him from getting paroled.

Governor vetoes audit for costs of death penalty in Nevada

Sandoval’s veto tally at 10 bills
By Ed Vogel
Las Vegas Review-Journal
Posted: Jun. 8, 2011

CARSON CITY — As the Legislature was rushing to adjourn at 1 a.m. Tuesday, Gov. Brian Sandoval was doing what he has done with increasing regularity during the legislative session: vetoing bills.

Sandoval vetoed Assembly Bill 501, which would have required an audit on the costs of the death penalty …

In vetoing the death penalty audit, Sandoval said he was not convinced it would be a fair audit.

“The bill, for example, lists the costs to be assessed in determining the overall fiscal impact of the imposition of the death penalty, but it does not specify how it is these costs will be assessed,” the governor said.

Sandoval, a former state attorney general and federal judge, said that death row inmates make “individualized litigation choices” that drive up the costs of their cases.

Nearly 80 prisoners are on Nevada’s death row in the Ely State Prison.

Almost all Republican legislators voted against the two bills.

Read the rest and the pieces inbetween here.