Packages allowed only for some, not for prisoners on administrative segregation, which is supposed to be no punitive measure

After a long absence, Packages for Nevada prisoners are again allowed, via one vendor, access:

http://www.nevadapackages.com/mainselect.php

Now here comes the illegal bit by the authorities:

When you are on administrative segregation, which does not count as a punishment, you are not allowed a package, because you are housed in certain units! This we have found out is what is happening in Ely State Prison, but it could also be happening in other prisons in Nevada.

There is no AR (regulation) that says that prisoners on Administrative segregation can not have such a food/clothes package. One of the things behind this is that the prison regime, the authorities, are afraid that prisoners are sharing things from their packages with others who may be on disciplinary segregation.

It is also a strange measure, because (some?) death row prisoners are allowed the packages, and they are housed on the same unit (3B) as those on disciplinary and administrative segregation. So is Nevada Department of Corrections lying to families and friends of prisoners?

Did they not check their own rules and regulations?

Question: how are the decisions made and where is the AR supporting the decision?
Administrative segregation-prisoners (who are not supposed to be punished) are the ones not getting packages, and that constitutes a due process violation.

The information-staff writes to tell prisoners to grieve this. But the grievances go to the administration, who do not want the prisoners to have these packages. So they will turn down the grievances! So what does Nevada Department of Corrections want? More angry prisoners? Les safety for its employees? That is the only conclusion we can make.

This all is an unnecessary decision against the NDOC´s own AR´s, meant to take up more time and frustration for prisoners and their families and loved ones.

Prisoners: grieve this and send copies to us all, so that we can demand proper, decent care for those in prisons.

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